Children's Dentistry FAQs

We are passionate about educating parents and children around proper dental care. If your question isn’t answered below feel free to contact us directly.

WHICH BABY TEETH COME IN FIRST?

Generally speaking, your baby’s teeth will erupt in pairs starting with the bottom front teeth followed by the top two front teeth. For full teeth, eruption guide visits our resources page here.

WHAT IS BABY BOTTLE DECAY?

Baby bottle decay is decay that forms in infants and toddlers appearing from falling asleep with bottles in their mouths or sucking on dummies that have been dipped in honey or syrup. Falling asleep suckling on milk or juice can cause the liquid to pool around your baby’s teeth, the sugars found in these drinks can react with bacteria present in the mouth to form decay – even if your child only has a couple of teeth. You can read more about this here.

WHEN CAN TODDLERS USE TOOTHPASTE?

When your baby reaches 18 months they can use a small pea sized amount of children’s toothpaste. Before this simply use water on a soft bristled toothbrush or wipe down gums with a damp cloth.

WHEN SHOULD I TAKE MY TODDLER TO THE DENTIST?

You should take your child to the dentist within 6 months of their first teeth erupting. This often falls around the age of 2.

HOW OFTEN SHOULD A CHILD BRUSH THEIR TEETH?

Children’s teeth need the same level of care as adult teeth. This means they should be brushed twice a day and flossed once a day.

WHAT AGE SHOULD YOU START FLOSSING YOUR TEETH?

Children’s teeth need flossing too! We recommend starting to floss once your child’s teeth have begun to fit together closely. This will be different for every child but should fall somewhere between 2 and 6. However, flossing can be tricky – especially for little hands – children will need assistance until around the age of 10 and supervision after that.

AT WHAT AGE DO BABY TEETH NORMALLY FALL OUT?

This will be different for each child. Generally, children begin to lose teeth between the age of 6 and 8 but do not be alarmed if your child hasn’t lost any teeth yet, every child is different. If you have concerns about your child’s development call us to schedule an assessment.

HOW OFTEN SHOULD CHILDREN SEE A DENTIST?

Children are more susceptible to decay than adults. For this reason, and the fact that their mouths are continually growing and changing, it is extremely important that they come to see the dentist every 6 months as recommended. Here we will be able to catch any problems early on and assess the course of development.

IS THUMB SUCKING BAD FOR CHILDREN'S TEETH?

Though thumb sucking is normal for children, when their permanent teeth start to come through, this can cause problems. When kids suck their thumbs, fingers or dummies this can cause their permanent teeth to misalign, which can cause issues. We recommend that if your child is still sucking their thumb by the age of six, then gently encourage them to stop with positive reinforcement techniques. If you are having any issues, our dentists will be able to suggest some positive methods to encourage your child to stop.

WHAT IF MY CHILD'S PERMANENT TOOTH FALLS OUT?

When a permanent tooth falls out, then it is classified as a dental emergency. You will need to seek dental care as soon as possible to save the tooth. When you are on your way to the dentist, try and hold the tooth in place. If this is not possible, you can store it in some milk or a container. This is why it’s important for children to wear mouthguards when playing sport so that this risk is reduced. You can find out more about mouthguards here.

WHAT FOODS AND DRINKS ARE BAD FOR CHILDREN'S TEETH?

The simple answer to this is sugar. Foods that contain a lot of sugar and not good for kids teeth. Sugar helps the bacteria and plaque in the mouth to break down teeth and cause things like tooth decay. Things like orange juice are also bad for teeth as the acid breaks down teeth over time. Foods and drinks that contain caffeine can cause teeth to go yellow, so things like chocolate and Cola (which contain both sugar and caffeine) are not so good for teeth. If your child has only small amounts of these things and cleans their teeth every day, then they will reduce the risk of decay and disease.

How does my oral health have an impact on my overall wellness?

Your daily routine should include taking care of your oral health. By maintaining good oral health and hygiene you can prevent gum disease, tooth decay and even, in severe cases, bone loss in your mouth.

Dental studies have revealed some startling new reasons to keep brushing and flossing every day – if your oral health wasn’t enough. There have been suggestions of an association between oral infections such as gum infections and poorly controlled diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and preterm labour and birth.

Your mouth is essentially a window into the health of the rest of your body. It can be a helpful vantage point in distinguishing the early signs of systemic disease. If your oral health wasn’t a big enough reason to take good care of your mouth, the relationship between your oral health and overall health should be.

Are dental x-rays necessary?

The dentists at Crookes and Jenkins Dental, may recommend x-rays early in your patient-dentist relationship. This will help to examine and record your oral health. X-rays can see into the hidden areas a simple check-up may not see.

The dentist can also compare older x-rays to newer x-rays for changes than may occur between appointments.

The dentist at Crookes and Jenkins dental will recommend x-rays based on the needs of individual patients. Those who are at risk for dental diseases like tooth decay may need them more regularly.

From our perspective, we may not be able to provide an accurate diagnosis, without x-rays. We want to give our patients the best care possible. Your dentist will recommend x-rays based on your individual needs.

Why would I need dental implants?

Dental implants were created to be a complete tooth replacement. They are screw shaped and made of a biocompatible material like titanium. This means the body is less likely reject the implant.

The dental implant is screwed into the jawbone and mimics the tooth root. After the implant has fused with your jawbone it will be strong enough to support a crown, bridge or a full denture.

Dental implants that have dentures, bridges or crowns placed over them can feel much more natural than traditional dental prosthetics such as removable dentures. Dentures and bridges that are attached to the strong dental implants can’t move around your mouth. This is a benefit to patients when eating and speaking.

Dental implants also minimise the risk of having your remaining teeth shift into the gaps left by missing teeth. If teeth move, a misaligned bite or crooked teeth may occur.

If you have lost teeth though injury or infection, dental implants that are placed early will give patients the greatest chance for an effective and aesthetic outcome.

To be a good candidate, you need healthy gums, have enough bone to support the implant, and good overall health. 

For more information on children’s dentistry visit our children’s dentistry page, tips page, or read through this blog.

Contact us today for more information or to book an appointment

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